CultureLab: Storytelling 2.0: When new narratives meet old brains

Posted: May 17, 2012 in cognition/consciousness, Story

Gazzaniga also thinks that this left-hemisphere “interpreter” creates the unified feeling of an autobiographical, personal, unique self. “The interpreter sustains a running narrative of our actions, emotions, thoughts, and dreams. The interpreter is the glue that keeps our story unified, and creates our sense of being a coherent, rational agent. To our bag of individual instincts it brings theories about our lives. These narratives of our past behaviour seep into our awareness and give us an autobiography,” he writes. The language areas of the left hemisphere are well placed to carry out these tasks. They draw on information in memory amygdalo-hippocampal circuits, dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and planning regions orbitofrontal cortices. As neurologist Jeffrey Saver has shown, damage to these regions disrupts narration in a variety of ways, ranging from unbounded narration, in which a person generates narratives unconstrained by reality, to denarration, the inability to generate any narratives, external or internal.

via CultureLab: Storytelling 2.0: When new narratives meet old brains.

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