The framing of the questions leads to different insights

Posted: June 16, 2013 in culture, Ideas, language

In physics, the Copenhagen interpretation defines energy/ matter as behaving sometimes like a wave and sometimes like a particle, which suggests that it is both, and posits that it is our human limitation to be unable to see both at the same time. The Nobel Prize-winning physicist Paul Dirac identified how light appears to be a particle if we ask a particle-like question, and a wave if we ask a wavelike question.

Physicists gain certain insights from understanding energy as a wave, and other insights from understanding it as a particle, and use quantum mechanics to reconcile the information they have gleaned.

via Einstein’s fatherly advice on the secret to learning anything, David Ogilvy on the 10 qualities of creative leaders, the power of love, and more.

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