Archive for the ‘Buddhism’ Category

Mindfulness – CBS News.

 
http://www.cbsnews.com/common/video/cbsnews_video.swf

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Stop Making Sense

 

Stop talking to yourself about silence
and talking to yourself about stillness.
You need not talk yourself into these states.
You need only stop talking altogether
and allow the silence and stillness
that are already always present to be undisturbed.
Begin to talk about them, woo them, try to create them,
and watch them move away.
You need not do anything to create silence; rather,
only stop with all the doing, the talking, the wooing
and silence is what’s left.
You need not try so very hard to remain still; rather,
only cease with all the movement, the effort, the chatter
and stillness is already present.
Rest within that stillness, that silence,
already here, uncreated, unadulterated,
and you may glimpse Natural Awareness:
not mere consciousness, which is always consciousness of something,
walled in by the reference points of self and other,
but Awareness—vast, undifferentiated, without reference points.
Not self, but Self, beyond all notions of self and other.
Not this, but That, beyond all ideas of this and that.
Yet, again, talk about Awareness, try to describe it
or grab hold of it, and you move away from it.
You crawl back into the safety of the cage
of the little self, with its bowls of food and water,
each bowl labeled neatly with your name and your reference points.
Only ask yourself: is it your destiny to live in this cage forever?
Do you really need these little bowls of kibble
when the vast open field of Awareness is waiting for you
just outside the door of your cage?

The view of totality, its attendant conception of reality called “Total Being,” and the understanding of the dynamic of realization—the relationship between individual practice and realization—begin to articulate the nonhierarchical view of the Diamond Approach. As we plumb the depths of our immediate experience, at some point, we can begin to uncover the underlying implications of its view. From the vantage of totality, we can discern not only the distinctness, the validity, and the experiential universe of that particular view but also the relationship of one worldview to another. Doing so unleashes the inherent freedom of reality, and reality shows its delight by leading us to other views and further mysteries. This is the upshot of uncertainty: We are loosed from the search for final meaning into a life of limitless adventure.

via Newest Book by A.H. Almaas: Runaway Realization | Science and Nonduality.

What distinguishes Rheingold’s work here is the attention to, well, attention. He’s talking about metacognition, or making ourselves more aware of what we’re doing online. We often divide our attention online, but at any given moment make “micro decisions” about what we’re going to do — write emails for work, watch a YouTube video, get lost in Twitter. Rheingold says we have to connect our attention to our intention and be more aware of how what we’re actively doing relates (or often doesn’t) to what we need.

via Howard Rheingold on how the five web literacies are becoming essential survival skills » Nieman Journalism Lab.

////Our focus needs to be on developing new literacies, new competences, to effectively use technology. The techniques of mind training in Buddhist meditation are quite helpful in reducing the tendency to get lost in media (monkey-mind on steroids). Owning our attention, practice honing our attention, is essential now more than ever. -lw

“Being Bigger on the Inside is not just limited to architecture such as buildings and other physical structures. Within media it can also apply to living creatures with incredibly spacious internal anatomy that characters who enter it eventually discover. Usually if terrestrial in origin, and not otherworldly or supernatural, then Artistic License – Biology has been employed. If extraterrestrial, then its simply a case of Bizarre Alien Biology at work.”

via Main/Bigger on the Inside – Television Tropes & Idioms.

//I’ve been trying to draw a Venn Diagram showing the differences between the representationalist, materialist scientific view of an objective reality independent of our investigations, and the Buddhist perspective.

The Buddhist view has the world of experience containing everything we sense, perceive, think, feel – including the so-called external world, since it is also perceived through our senses and thoughts. If you think of the mind as in, or dependent on, the brain (a limited view, but common), then our world of experience includes everything: there is no outside.

So, seeing the brain, it seems to be true – it is bigger on the inside. :?)